Sebuah buku yang memuat pengakuan sebagai “Worlds No.1 Hacker” atau Hacker Nomor 1 dunia telah menghentak banyak komunitas Computer Security dengan isu-isu dan rumor terkait plagiarisme, rasisme bahkan permusuhan terhadap orang-orang yang menerbitkan podcast security dan keluarganya.

Buku How to Become the Worlds No.1 Hacker” ini ditulis oleh Gregory D. Evans, seorang yang dikenal sebagagai CEO dari Ligatt Security International, sebuah firma keamanan yang menawarkan jasa computer security ke perusahaan-perusahaan komputer dengan imbalan 0,0002 sen per hasil. Buku yang diterbitkan oleh rumah penerbitan Cyber Crime Media ini setebal 342 halaman PDF, merupakan salah satu buku yang membahas secara komprehensif, langkah-per-langkah panduan seorang awam untuk belajar memperkuat jaringannya dari attacker, keamanan Unix, Cracking Wi-FI dan konfigurasi lanjutan dari layanan-layanan web.

Masalah berkembang ketika ternyata didapati pada Chapter 12, ternyata identik (5.894 kata) dengan tutorial Port Scanning yang ditulis oleh Armando Romeo di HackersCenter.com, diterbitkan tanpa meminta ijin penulis. Di bab 9 juga ditemukan tutorial yang identik dengan milik Chris Gates di EthicalHacker.net.

Bagaimana mungkin seorang Hacker No. 1 dunia ternyata hanyalah seorang Plagiat?

In all, at least 13 of the e-book’s 26 chapters were lifted almost entirely word-for-word from other sources without attribution, according to this analysis from Ben Rothke, a senior security consultant for a professional services firm, who ran the portions through iThenticate, an online tool for spotting plagiarism. Other sources that were used without credit include Security Focus, Auditmypc.com, and Squidoo.com.

“Mr Evans has never asked any permission from me and I’m the only owner of the copyrights of my website,” said Armando Romeo, CEO of eLearnSecurity who says in all five Chapters in How to Become the World’s No. 1 Hacker “have been literally copied and pasted from my guides” on the Hacker Center website. He added that this is the second run-in he’s had with Evans, who regularly appears on local and national TV shows to talk about computer security.

Chris Gates and Donald Donzal, the author and editor respectively of the articles on the Ethical Hacker site, are also steadfast that Evans never had permission to use their content, which was first published published in 2007. Donzal said he’s in the process of filing a take-down demand under the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Evans – who in 2002 was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison after pleading guilty to wire fraud – has vociferously defended his use of the previously published articles. In an interview with The Register, he said he began work on the book in 2008, and largely drew on ghost writers who by contract agreed to submit “original content.” He insisted the submissions were vetted for authenticity by a service he declined to name. But he nonetheless went on to challenge the authors who have stepped forward to complain their work has been misappropriated.
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Via TheRegister