Linux News Today: Linux Kernel 4.6 Has Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.7.1

Immediately after announcing the availability of the first point release for the Linux 4.7 kernel series, Greg Kroah-Hartman also informed the community about the launch of Linux kernel 4.6.7.

Linux kernel 4.6.7 is the seventh maintenance update for the Linux 4.6 stable kernel branch, but it also looks like it’s the last one for the series, which has now officially reached end of life. Therefore, if you’re using a GNU/Linux operating system powered by a kernel from the Linux 4.6 branch, you are urged to move to Linux kernel 4.7 as soon as possible by installing the brand new Linux kernel 4.7.1 build.

“I’m announcing the release of the 4.6.7 kernel. All users of the 4.6 kernel series must upgrade,” says Greg Kroah-Hartman in today’s announcement. “Note, this is the LAST 4.6.y kernel to be released, please move to 4.7.1 now, you have been warned. The updated 4.6.y git tree can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git;a=summary.”

Here’s what’s new in Linux kernel 4.6.7

If you’re still interested in running a kernel from the Linux 4.6 series, we would like to inform you about the changes implemented in the Linux kernel 4.6.7 release, as according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the previous maintenance update, Linux kernel 4.6.6, a total of 63 files were changed, with 618 insertions and 271 deletions. Among the improvements, there are fixes for the x86, PowerPC (PPC), MIPS, and ARM hardware architectures, as well as EXT4, UDF, and FUSE filesystems.

Of course, there are also several updated drivers, this time for things like CPUFreq, I2C, Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Module (NVDIMM), Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA), TTY, and networking (mostly Ethernet), and it looks like the networking stack received IPv6, IPv4, 8021q, and IrDA improvements. The Linux kernel 4.6.7 sources are avaiable for download right now via our website, as well as from kernel.org.

Via Softpedia

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