Linux News Today: Server-Oriented Alpine Linux 3.4.3 Lands with Kernel 4.4.17 LTS, ownCloud 9.0.4

The Alpine Linux development team is happy to announce the release and general availability for download of the third maintenance update to the Alpine Linux 3.4 series of server-oriented operating systems.

Alpine Linux 3.4.3 is here three weeks after the release of version 3.4.2 on July 25 and promises to add the latest long-term supported Linux 4.4.17 kernel, along with numerous updated components that represent the security fixes for the month of August. Also, this update addresses some of the bugs reported by users lately.

“The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.4.3 of its Alpine Linux operating system,” reads the release announcement. “This is a bugfix release of the v3.4 musl based branch, based on linux-4.4.17 kernels. The full lists of changes can be found in the git log and bug tracker.”

Here’s what’s new in Alpine Linux 3.4.3

Looking at the release notes, we can notice that Alpine Linux 3.4.3 ships with quite a lot of updated core components, among which we can mention the libarchive 3.2.1, libidn 1.33, and libwebsockets 2.0.2 libraries, BIND 9.10.4-p2 open-source DNS implementation, cURL 7.50.1 data transfer tool, and Dropbear 2016.74 SSH client.

Moreover, the Fontconfig 2.12.1 font configuration tool, LibreOffice 5.1.4.2 office suite, ownCloud 9.0.4 self-hosting cloud server, collectd 5.5.2 daemon for collecting system performance statistics, and PHP 5.6.24 server-side HTML embedded scripting language have also been added in the new Alpine Linux 3.4.3 maintenance release.

Besides that, the third Alpine Linux 3.4 update comes with many security fixes for the OpenRC init system, Apache web server, BusyBox collection of command-line system tools, Xen hypervisor, and the alpine-conf, alpine-mirrors, and open-iscsi components. Download Alpine Linux 3.4.3 right now via our website and make sure you update your existing Alpine Linux installation to the latest release, always.

Via Softpedia

%d bloggers like this: